POLL - Song Title SMALL - CHAT THREAD 16-22...SMALL - ENTRY THREAD 16-2...HeronSong Title CHAT thread 1s...Song Title ENTRY thread 1...Poll - Days out - 18th-25...Windows 10 19H1 is headin...POLL - SchoolSchool - Weekly Comp Entr...SCHOOL - Weekly comp Chat...Entry Thread - Days out -...POLL - DoorwaysChat Thread - Days out - ...1957 Ferrari California 2...Doorways - Entry Thread w...

Author Topic: What's your approach?  (Read 4960 times)

Offline greypoint

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1041
What's your approach?
« on: July 31, 2009, 08:16:28 AM »
A few years ago a fellow forum member posted a thread about how he had gone about photographing a particular landscape. He'd visited the place, taken notes, worked out where to shoot from, took light readings etc.etc. - then gone back the next day to take carefully formulated pictures. Being of the serendipity school of photography I'd have gone along with the camera and just tried various angles and settings as they occurred to me and as the light seemed to dictate on the day.
What's your approach - are you a careful planner - when you're off out for the day do you take every possible lens, filter and flash just in case? Do you travel light and just take things as they come? What's your general approach to taking pictures?



Offline bones615

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 413
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2009, 09:54:20 AM »
Snap, snap, snap then realise the ISO is wrong or the aperture, went to London last weekend in & out of museums etc always on the wrong settings. Went with minimal gear Sigma 24-70mm & canon 70-210 & I never used the second lens so I could have gone lighter. Maybe should have taken the flash for inside the museums but some places don't allow flash photography anyway.
A place to avoid if you go is Ripley's - expensive to get in & rubbish even the kids were underwhelmed, could have seen more interesting things in a local junk shop.

Offline Oldboy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5224
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2009, 10:48:56 AM »
I think it all depends on the day, as light levels will changes within minutes sometimes. I once went out to take photos of the frost around dawn. As the sun rose I photographed the dawn but before I could take any photos of the frost, grey flat clouds came in and killed the light. I gave up and went home.  :(
What I do tend to do is notice what will make a great photo, when the conditions are right, and will return there later to take the photo.  ;D

Offline alan1572

  • I'll do it tomorrow
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 642
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2009, 11:16:38 AM »
i can't even plan when i'm going out with the camera let alone what the light conditions are, as i only have 3 lenses i normally take them all, i don't have any filter's so i don't take any ;D
like bones i often on the wrong settings so i mostly take a couple of shots on auto and then have a play with the manual settings and then a large slice of hope pie is needed.
Who wanted dry roasted with their pint?

Offline irv_b

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1045
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2009, 05:19:03 PM »
i can't even plan when i'm going out with the camera let alone what the light conditions are, as i only have 3 lenses i normally take them all, i don't have any filter's so i don't take any ;D
like bones i often on the wrong settings so i mostly take a couple of shots on auto and then have a play with the manual settings and then a large slice of hope pie is needed.
We should have the wrong settings club! cos I am for ever doing it especially to get a rushed shot only to find its eye blinkingly bright or eye peering dark :-[
My Gallery

Don't count the days "Guest," make the days count!.

Offline Bigbill

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 159
    • Gigstills
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2009, 05:30:58 PM »
Hello from Windy Sheffy.
Now then,i usualy pitch up,put the 12 tonne bag down and just sit for 15 mins looking around and thinking,,,,,no set formula just react to whats going on.Can ofcourse be quite the opposite if things are changing quickly,ie the dragon fly is flitting about or the rain is imminent(usualy is round here).
As for wrong settings club,ermm,i once did a whole days shoot around Edale,which involved some sharp uphill walking,and when i got home,id left the damn camera on the previous nights rock show settings,including iso 1600,,,,i was REALLY chuffed about that !
Heres one for you all,who can come with a good Mnemomic for making sure ALL settings are checked at the start of a shoot ??

Shine On

Offline alan1572

  • I'll do it tomorrow
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 642
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2009, 05:57:53 PM »
i can't even plan when i'm going out with the camera let alone what the light conditions are, as i only have 3 lenses i normally take them all, i don't have any filter's so i don't take any ;D
like bones i often on the wrong settings so i mostly take a couple of shots on auto and then have a play with the manual settings and then a large slice of hope pie is needed.
We should have the wrong settings club! cos I am for ever doing it especially to get a rushed shot only to find its eye blinkingly bright or eye peering dark :-[
looks like bill wants in ;D
i won't mention the time i left the memory card in thepc and spent the day snapping HMS Lusty in liverpool, lucky i could go back the next day
Who wanted dry roasted with their pint?

Offline greypoint

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1041
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2009, 06:15:07 PM »
I'm still not sure how I managed to change my D90 from large/fine JPEG to small/fine JPEG half way through the afternoon at a dog show...took a while to realise why the top lcd showed so many shots left. And there was the time I shot the entire day with my Fuji S5 on 'Velvia' setting - saturated colours were'nt in it!

skellum

  • Guest
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2009, 07:45:36 PM »
I aggree with Old Boy about going back to something you have seen when the light and conditions are suitable for the shot you want to create. I once went back to some telephone boxes in the dark & rain to get the right atmosphere. People kept looking at me as if I was mad but it has turned out to be my best seller to date. :legit:
« Last Edit: July 31, 2009, 07:48:21 PM by skellum ( Dave ) »

Offline anglefire

  • Canon Biggamist. Four bodies and some lenses. :)
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1362
  • Canon Owner and Proud of it :)
    • Mark Colston Photography
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2009, 09:03:47 PM »
If I do shots for work, I know that I generally need wide - due to mostly being in plantrooms, so its the 5D, 17-40 and the flash gun.

If I shoot for myself, then I tend to take most of my kit, though I will select lenses - ie generally wide or generally long.

As for going to places for a particular light - only done that really in the Lakes when I went with a group of us from DPG and did a sun rise. 
----------------------------------
Mark
* A HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSE - THE SHORT STORY* 'Hydrogen is a light, odourless gas, which, given enough time, turns into people.'

CPS Gold Member
My Website

Offline greypoint

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1041
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2009, 11:57:09 AM »
And to carry on the theme of how you approach your hobby, what's your average shutter count? I know it varies a lot according to subject but are you of the 'better take just a few more just in case' school or the more measured 'get it right first time' type? Most shots I've taken at an event this year was the two day agility show where I took around 4,000 shots mostly on the D90 - that's when a D300 seemed like a good idea!

Offline Bigbill

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 159
    • Gigstills
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2009, 01:26:37 PM »
Now then,,
Funny one this,at a Gig i,ll easily take 250 shots on each of my 2 cameras in 2.5 hrs,,,,,then again,if i,m wandering about the countryside its quite the opposite,the waterfall last weekend i only did 50 odd shots in 2 hours,to be honest i much prefer the slow easy approach,at one Athletics event i had the d300 on continuous,and took millions of shots,wading through them after was a real pain,,,,,,imagine all of this in the days of film !!

Shine On

Offline anglefire

  • Canon Biggamist. Four bodies and some lenses. :)
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1362
  • Canon Owner and Proud of it :)
    • Mark Colston Photography
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2009, 01:30:03 PM »
Again, if I'm at work, I'm no generally looking for artistic shots just record ones - but at the end I do go for the arty type. But even so, may only take 20-30 shots in a day.

Out at the wildlife center the other week, I took ~2500 - and most motor sport events I take a similar number in a day. Most I've done was for the Rally of the Midlands last year, when I took nearly 4000 - and on a single battery charge too!
----------------------------------
Mark
* A HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSE - THE SHORT STORY* 'Hydrogen is a light, odourless gas, which, given enough time, turns into people.'

CPS Gold Member
My Website

Offline Oldboy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5224
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2009, 02:08:24 PM »
And to carry on the theme of how you approach your hobby, what's your average shutter count? I know it varies a lot according to subject but are you of the 'better take just a few more just in case' school or the more measured 'get it right first time' type? Most shots I've taken at an event this year was the two day agility show where I took around 4,000 shots mostly on the D90 - that's when a D300 seemed like a good idea!
It depends on what I'm shooting but usually have the camera set to take two shots at a time. With butterflies or flying birds, like Swifts or Swallows, usually take a burst of four or five shots, as you haven't got time to press the shutter in single shots. This makes sure I have a few that are spot on. The most I've taken in a day is just over 800 spread over about eight hours.  ;D

Offline greypoint

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1041
Re: What's your approach?
« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2009, 03:42:38 PM »
When I'm out for a day's general bird/nature/whatever turns up type photography I find what happens is I tend to take a number of shots just for the sake of it early on - especially if the weather and light are good - just in case nothing much turns up later. I think that's why I end up with so many shots at the end of the day!

 

latest Posts

Subject Board Views/Replies Member Date & Time
xx POLL - Song Title International Weekly Comp Entries 305/5 Jediboy Last post September 16, 2019, 10:49:12 AM
xx SMALL - CHAT THREAD 16-22nd September `19 International Weekly Comp Entries 43/0 jinky Last post September 16, 2019, 10:00:15 AM
xx SMALL - ENTRY THREAD 16-22nd September `19 International Weekly Comp Entries 66/0 jinky Last post September 16, 2019, 09:59:37 AM
xx Heron Wildlife Photography 133/4 anglefire Last post September 16, 2019, 07:17:49 AM
xx Song Title CHAT thread 1st-8th September `19 International Weekly Comp Entries 896/36 jinky Last post September 13, 2019, 03:02:01 PM
xx Song Title ENTRY thread 1st-8th September `19 International Weekly Comp Entries 185/4 Jediboy Last post September 09, 2019, 03:08:08 PM
xx Poll - Days out - 18th-25th August 2019 International Weekly Comp Entries 348/7 Hinfrance Last post September 08, 2019, 07:17:09 AM
xx Windows 10 19H1 is heading your way. PC computer questions, tips and how to's 2879/35 Mick Last post September 07, 2019, 02:45:08 PM