Camera Craniums

General Category => General Photography => Topic started by: Geoff on March 28, 2014, 10:13:50 PM

Title: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: Geoff on March 28, 2014, 10:13:50 PM
I have been trying to move my photography up a notch  using slow shutter speeds however
I am getting very mixed results,  most of my pic's are coming  out  over exposed any advice.

Geoff
Title: Re: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: Alfonso_Frisk on March 28, 2014, 10:49:42 PM
I have been trying to move my photography up a notch  using slow shutter speeds however
I am getting very mixed results,  most of my pic's are coming  out  over exposed any advice.

Geoff
What settings you using?
what kit ? filters for example
what is the subject?
are you using a tripod with remote release or timer?

more info needed Geoff
Title: Re: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: jinky on March 29, 2014, 05:57:59 AM
Put up an example with the exif details and it will be easier to see what`s going on.
Title: Re: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: Hinfrance on March 29, 2014, 07:00:06 AM
I agree we need more data.

First guess is that you are using speeds too low for the camera to stop down far enough to prevent over exposure. Do you have any neutral density filters?
Title: Re: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: Jediboy on March 29, 2014, 08:42:41 AM
Are you using a filter Geoff? Normally you'd use an ND here.
Title: Re: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: Alfonso_Frisk on March 29, 2014, 08:46:55 AM
I can not see what in camera settings you are using here, however it does look like your shooting into light source ?
Grad filters are must here, and depending on the conditions it still would be a case of trial and error.
1 second at F13 with a 3 stop grad might be a starting point, but, if its a bright day as I suspect you may even have to go to big 10 stopper or even better come back and try when light is suitable
There is an app for ipod called LeExp calculator which is a nice tool for suggesting which filter to use

You also need to be careful with metering.
In light scenes you must add exposure & in dark scenes reduce it as the camera’s meter is set up to average everything out as a mid tone,
Good luck
Alf
Title: Re: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: Jediboy on March 29, 2014, 09:01:14 AM
I used a 10 stop ND for this photo. There was a lot of trial and error with it, but I couldn't have done this without the filter.
'Smaller' stop filters can produce similar effect.

(http://cameracraniums.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11327/normal_Lock_frame_comp_2.jpg) (http://cameracraniums.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pid=15293&fullsize=1)
Title: Re: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: Jediboy on March 29, 2014, 09:04:35 AM
Just a thought, try long exposures at night. No filters needed and the results an be wonderful. Tripod essential though!
Title: Re: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: Jediboy on March 29, 2014, 10:57:01 AM
Good luck Geoff, and let us know how you get on.  :)
Title: Re: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: donoreo on March 29, 2014, 04:18:04 PM
Perhaps on a related topic, if you do not have any ND filters and do not want to spend much, there are ways around it. 

1. Circular Polarizer.  They usually drop light by about 2 stops slowing your shutter speed.  Also handy for reflections, really vibrant colours, blue skies, etc. This would be most used filter. 
2. Welder's Glass.  Produce horrid colour casts so you must shoot raw and fix on the computer.  Quality will often lack. Need to improvise holding in front of lens. (elastics)
3. Inexpensive ND filters.  Can go circular or square.  Square need to have holders or improvise as above.  Circular of course are difference sizes, but you can get the largest you would need and then get cheap stepping rings to go down in size for other lenses. 

The April Digital Photo has a test on inexpensive ND filters.  Their top choice is from here http://www.srb-photographic.co.uk/ I was recently recommended these by a few in another forum. 

One more thing..variable ND filters.  These are circular and rotate to adjust how much light they block.  How they work is that they are two polarizers together.  They are ok for small amounts of light but they are never good to block lots, they tend to get an X in the middle of different light.  I bought a cheap on to play with. 
Title: Re: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: Mick on March 29, 2014, 05:39:52 PM
http://www.7dayshop.com have some cheapie ND filters, which as pointed out, sounds like the direction you should be heading tbh. ;)

http://www.7dayshop.com/photo-video-supplies/lens-filters-filter-accessories?cat=437
Title: Re: Slow shutter pic's
Post by: Jediboy on March 30, 2014, 05:02:25 PM
You've got the water flowing Geoff, but they still look over exposed. Did you use the filter you said you had found, and what sort of filter is it?
The top one looks better, so you are clearly on the right track.  :tup: